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Graphene Study 2023

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Obergurgl, Austria
2-6 April 2023
  • Obergurgl, Austria
  • 2-6 April 2023

Beyond graphene - additional 2D materials application​s


The Graphene Flagship hosts Graphene Study to help PhD students and early career researchers develop into outstanding researchers in graphene. This edition will explore 2D materials for tomorrow.​ What is next? What can we expect from graphene science and applications in the future?​ View the full agenda below.

Graphene Study 2023 Confirmed Speakers:

VTT

Miika Soikkeli


Jamie Fitzgerald
Philipps Universität Marburg

Jamie Fitzgerald


PRELIMINARY PROGRAMME

Please note that changes may occur.

15:00 15:00 - 19:00

Check-in

17:00 17:00 - 19:00

Registration

17:50 17:50 - 18:40
Lecture

Welcome lecture

19:00 19:00 - 20:30
Networking

Welcome dinner

07:00 07:00 - 08:45
Networking

Breakfast

09:00 09:00 - 09:50
Lecture

Beyond graphene – How to synthesise relevant hexagonal boron nitride

Catherine Journet

Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) occupies a special place in the vast world of 2D materials, and is emerging as a promising candidate for 2D-based technologies due to its excellent thermal, chemical, mechanical, and dielectric properties. In particular, new optoelectronic applications require high crystallinity quality hBN with low defect density and low contamination. However, it is now well established that the optical, electronic, and transport properties of these systems are highly dependent on the chemical purity and crystallinity of the hBN used, which in turn are highly dependent on the synthesis approach used. 

While vapor-phase processes such as chemical vapor deposition can produce large-area hexagonal boron nitride thin films, it is also possible to obtain very high-quality exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets from self-supporting crystals.  

These different synthesis methods will be described with emphasis on the size, purity and defects of the obtained materials. These considerations are based on various recent physical studies, including optical characterizations such as luminescence measurements, highlighting the crystallinity and structural defects of hBN. 

Catherine Journet
09:50 09:50 - 10:40

Novel applications of 2D materials from wearable health to memory devices and 6G switches

Deji Akinwande

This talk will present our latest research adventures on 2D nanomaterials towards greater scientific understanding and advanced engineering applications. In particular, the talk will highlight our work on flexible electronics, single-atom monolayer memory, non-volatile RF/5G/6G switches, covid sensors, and wearable tattoo sensors for mobile health.

Non-volatile memory devices based on 2D materials are an application of defects and is a rapidly advancing field with rich physics that can be attributed to metal adsorption into vacancies. The memory devices can be used for neuromorphic computing and operate as switches up to 500GHz.

Likewise, from a practical point, electronic tattoos based on graphene have ushered a new material platform that has highly desirable practical attributes including optical transparency, mechanical imperceptibility, and is the thinnest conductive electrode sensor that can be integrated on skin for physiological measurements including blood pressure monitoring with Class A performance. Much of these research achievements have been published in leading journals.

Deji Akinwande
10:40 10:40 - 11:00
Networking

Coffee break

11:00 11:00 - 11:50
Lecture

Two-dimensional Xenes: Synthesis, processing and manipulation

Alessandro Molle

Isolation of graphene paves the way to a new and unprecedentedly rich fashion of two-dimensional (2D) materials. While many of them can be readily derived by mechanical exfoliation in the form of single-crystal flakes, a synthetic approach to the 2D materials production is functional to have both scalability and atomic control as enabling factors for applications and technology transfer. While many of them are derived through exfoliation methods, an urgent need remains as to how to synthesize them through scalable schemes and manipulate them in diverse configurations by design. To this purpose, a bottom-up approach to the crystal growth is functional to have both scalability and atomic control as enabling factors for applications and technology transfer. Xenes, namely 2D single-element materials, are a representative case in this respect [1]. Here, I will report on the more relevant methods to synthesize representative cases of these two classes of 2D materials with focus on the manipulation potential, processing scheme, and integration steps into application platforms. Here I will show several bottom-up approaches to the controlled synthesis and manipulation of 2D materials beyond graphene.

Xenes are he natural followers of graphene as they are 2D crystal made by single atoms beyond carbon. They constitute an emerging nanomaterials platform with potential for quantum nanoelectronics, spintronics, and topological application [2]. A taxonomy of the Xenes will be presented with element X spanning from the IV column of the periodic table (e.g., silicene), to the adjacent columns (e.g. borophene, phosphorene, tellurene, etc.). I will show how large area Xenes can be produced through epitaxial methods by leveraging on a tailored choice of the growth conditions [3], how they should be stabilized to further up the integration into transistor device structures [4], and how they may ultimately end up in multiple Xene combinations inside epitaxial Xene heterostructures [5]. In the end, I will bring the discussion to the manipulation of the above-mentioned 2D materials to extreme bendable layouts so as to prove their versatility to be used in flexible substrates or configurations.

Acknowledgement: funding from H2020 ERC-COG grant n. 772261 “XFab”.

Alessandro Molle
11:50 11:50 - 12:40

Mesoscopic transport and gate-defined nanostructures in bilayer graphene

Luca Banszerus

Bilayer graphene (BLG) is an intriguing material with a number of unique properties. It allows for tuning its band structure from semi-metallic in the intrinsic case to semiconducting when applying a perpendicular electric field. The opening of a band gap then allows to confine charge carriers to e.g. quantum point contacts and quantum dots.  

The presence of only weak spin-orbit interaction in combination with low hyperfine-coupling promises long spin lifetimes in BLG and makes it a very promising host materials for spin qubits.

The presence of a finite Berry curvature in BLG allows to control the valley degree of freedom magnetically, electrically and optically, which opens a way to utilize the valley degree of freedom as a potential host system for quantum information processing.  

In this lecture, I will give an introduction to bilayer graphene with a focus on the band structure and the berry curvature. I will then present recent mesoscopic transport experiments in point contacts and quantum dots of bilayer graphene realized in ultraclean van-der-Waals heterostructures and sketch a possible route to BLG based qubits.  

Luca Banszerus
13:00 13:00 - 14:30
Networking

Lunch

14:30 14:30 - 16:30
Skills development workshop

Sustainability aspects of 2D innovations

Sofia Öiseth

16:30 16:30 - 17:00
Networking

Coffee break

17:00 17:00 - 17:50
Lecture

Novel applications of 2D materials from wearable health to memory devices and 6G switches

Deji Akinwande

This talk will present our latest research adventures on 2D nanomaterials towards greater scientific understanding and advanced engineering applications. In particular, the talk will highlight our work on flexible electronics, single-atom monolayer memory, non-volatile RF/5G/6G switches, covid sensors, and wearable tattoo sensors for mobile health.

Non-volatile memory devices based on 2D materials are an application of defects and is a rapidly advancing field with rich physics that can be attributed to metal adsorption into vacancies. The memory devices can be used for neuromorphic computing and operate as switches up to 500GHz.

Likewise, from a practical point, electronic tattoos based on graphene have ushered a new material platform that has highly desirable practical attributes including optical transparency, mechanical imperceptibility, and is the thinnest conductive electrode sensor that can be integrated on skin for physiological measurements including blood pressure monitoring with Class A performance. Much of these research achievements have been published in leading journals.

Deji Akinwande
17:50 17:50 - 18:40
Networking

Dinner

19:30 19:30 - 21:30
Poster session

Poster session I

21:30 21:30 - 23:30
Networking

Networking session

07:00 07:00 - 08:45
Networking

Breakfast

09:00 09:00 - 09:50
Lecture

Scalable synthesis of high-quality 2D materials and vdW heterostructures

Camilla Coletti

To make bidimensional (2D) materials realistically appealing for applications, approaches to synthesize them in a scalable manner while maintaining high crystalline quality have to be demonstrated and optimized. In this talk, I will discuss the most common synthetic approaches to obtain wafer-scale growth of 2D materials such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides, and 2D homo- and heterostructures and discuss the properties and applicative prospects of these materials. 

Camilla Coletti
09:50 09:50 - 10:40

Contact and phase-engineering of 2D materials

Peter Bøggild

One main limiting factor for many types of 2D device applications is contact resistance. While semiconducting 2D materials offer a very wide range of band structures, different useful electronic and optical properties that are generally easy to tune, it is surprisingly challenging to achieve low, ohmic contact resistance between a metal contact and the semiconductor. In the lecture the main causes of 2D contact resistance are briefly explained. While 2D materials are difficult to contact, they also offer some exciting possibilities for materials engineering that can alleviate contact resistances: surface functionalisation, Fermi-level depinning and using semimetallic TMDs as contact materials. Finally, I will discuss phase engineering - controlled phase transitions - and how powerful this tool can be in addressing not only contact resistance, but also new functionalities in 2D materials and devices.

Peter Bøggild
10:40 10:40 - 11:00
Networking

Coffee break

11:00 11:00 - 11:50
Lecture

Exciton polaritons in TMDs

Jamie Fitzgerald

Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayers possess a rich landscape of bright and dark excitons due to their multi-valley bandstructure, large spin-orbit coupling, and strong Coulomb interaction between charge carriers [1]. Furthermore, they can be stacked to form van der Waals heterostructures which support spatially separated interlayer excitons. If a finite twist angle is applied between the TMD layers, excitons can form flat bands and become spatially localized in the resulting moiré potential. Such material configurations represent an exciting new direction for exploring many body physics and designing optoelectronic devices. In this talk, I will review some of our research at the Ultrafast Quantum Dynamics Group at the Philipps University of Marburg, and give a didactic introduction to the theoretical techniques that we employ to model 2D semiconductors, i.e., the semiconductor Bloch equations. I will also focus on the hybridization of excitons with cavity photons in the strong coupling regime, and discuss a combined density-matrix and Hopfield approach we have developed to model a TMD mono-/bi-layer integrated within a high-quality Fabry-Perot microcavity. I will conclude with a discussion of some recent work where we provide a first microscopic model of moiré exciton polaritons [2], optical signatures of exciton polariton-dark exciton interactions via phonons [3], and explore strategies for efficiently coupling light into interlayer polaritons.  
 
[1] Perea-Causin, Raul, et al. "Exciton optics, dynamics and transport in atomically thin semiconductors." arXiv preprint arXiv:2209.09533 (2022).  
[2] Fitzgerald, Jamie M., Joshua JP Thompson, and Ermin Malic. "Twist Angle Tuning of Moiré Exciton Polaritons in van der Waals Heterostructures." Nano Letters (2022).  
[3] Ferreira, Beatriz, et al. "Signatures of dark excitons in exciton-polariton optics of transition metal dichalcogenides." arXiv preprint arXiv:2209.03133 (2022).  

Jamie Fitzgerald
11:50 11:50 - 12:40

TBD

Miika Soikkeli

Miika Soikkeli
13:00 13:00 - 14:30
Networking

Lunch

14:30 14:30 - 16:30
Skills development workshop

TBD

16:30 16:30 - 17:00
Networking

Coffee break

17:00 17:00 - 17:50
Lecture

Beyond graphene – How to synthesise relevant hexagonal boron nitride

Catherine Journet

Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) occupies a special place in the vast world of 2D materials, and is emerging as a promising candidate for 2D-based technologies due to its excellent thermal, chemical, mechanical, and dielectric properties. In particular, new optoelectronic applications require high crystallinity quality hBN with low defect density and low contamination. However, it is now well established that the optical, electronic, and transport properties of these systems are highly dependent on the chemical purity and crystallinity of the hBN used, which in turn are highly dependent on the synthesis approach used. 

While vapor-phase processes such as chemical vapor deposition can produce large-area hexagonal boron nitride thin films, it is also possible to obtain very high-quality exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets from self-supporting crystals.  

These different synthesis methods will be described with emphasis on the size, purity and defects of the obtained materials. These considerations are based on various recent physical studies, including optical characterizations such as luminescence measurements, highlighting the crystallinity and structural defects of hBN. 

17:50 17:50 - 18:40
Networking

Dinner

19:30 19:30 - 21:30
Poster session

Poster session II

21:30 21:30 - 23:30
Networking

After poster party

07:00 07:00 - 08:45
Networking

Breakfast

09:00 09:00 - 09:50
Lecture

Two-dimensional semiconductors for quantum science and technologies

Amalia Patanè 

Semiconductors are the pillars of modern science and technologies. Their growing demand in high-performance systems for sensing, communications and computing, is paralleled by opportunities for advances in quantum science and technologies. However, the latter require a shift toward miniaturized materials with precise control of their physical properties.  

Two-dimensional (2d) materials based on van der Waals (vdW) crystals provide an important platform for scientific and technological developments. Today, the family of vdW crystals comprises a “zoo” of over 1000 materials. However, only a few dozen of these have emerged as promising 2d semiconductors (2SEM). In particular, 2SEM based on III-VI metal chalcogenides, MC (M = group-III metals Ga and In; C = group-VI chalcogens S, Se and Te) can exist in a variety of stoichiometries, crystal structures and layer stacking sequences with physical properties of great interest for quantum science. The strong electron correlations, topological phases predicted in MC do not have counterparts in traditional SEM. Although several concepts in solid-state physics still apply to these materials, standard theories have been revisited to describe these emerging materials with potential for important discoveries.  

Here, I will review my research on 2SEM and present a unique-in-the world facility (EPI2SEM, https://bit.ly/3zN00dx) for EPItaxial growth and in situ analysis of 2SEM in ultra-high vacuum. EPI2SEM consists of a custom-designed reactor for molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) whose UHV operation matches the UHV requirements for in situ analytical techniques, such as RHEED (reflection high energy electron diffraction), SPM (scanning probe microscopy) and nanoESCA (electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis). By integration of growth, advanced microscopy and spectroscopy in UHV, we device methods to create atomically thin semiconductors based on MC with engineered physical properties beyond the current state-of-the-art.  

Amalia Patanè 
09:50 09:50 - 10:40

Mesoscopic transport and gate-defined nanostructures in bilayer graphene

Luca Banszerus

Bilayer graphene (BLG) is an intriguing material with a number of unique properties. It allows for tuning its band structure from semi-metallic in the intrinsic case to semiconducting when applying a perpendicular electric field. The opening of a band gap then allows to confine charge carriers to e.g. quantum point contacts and quantum dots.  

The presence of only weak spin-orbit interaction in combination with low hyperfine-coupling promises long spin lifetimes in BLG and makes it a very promising host materials for spin qubits.

The presence of a finite Berry curvature in BLG allows to control the valley degree of freedom magnetically, electrically and optically, which opens a way to utilize the valley degree of freedom as a potential host system for quantum information processing.  

In this lecture, I will give an introduction to bilayer graphene with a focus on the band structure and the berry curvature. I will then present recent mesoscopic transport experiments in point contacts and quantum dots of bilayer graphene realized in ultraclean van-der-Waals heterostructures and sketch a possible route to BLG based qubits.  

Luca Banszerus
10:40 10:40 - 11:00
Networking

Coffee break

11:00 11:00 - 11:50
Lecture

Two-dimensional semiconductors for quantum science and technologies

Amalia Patanè 

Semiconductors are the pillars of modern science and technologies. Their growing demand in high-performance systems for sensing, communications and computing, is paralleled by opportunities for advances in quantum science and technologies. However, the latter require a shift toward miniaturized materials with precise control of their physical properties.  

Two-dimensional (2d) materials based on van der Waals (vdW) crystals provide an important platform for scientific and technological developments. Today, the family of vdW crystals comprises a “zoo” of over 1000 materials. However, only a few dozen of these have emerged as promising 2d semiconductors (2SEM). In particular, 2SEM based on III-VI metal chalcogenides, MC (M = group-III metals Ga and In; C = group-VI chalcogens S, Se and Te) can exist in a variety of stoichiometries, crystal structures and layer stacking sequences with physical properties of great interest for quantum science. The strong electron correlations, topological phases predicted in MC do not have counterparts in traditional SEM. Although several concepts in solid-state physics still apply to these materials, standard theories have been revisited to describe these emerging materials with potential for important discoveries.  

Here, I will review my research on 2SEM and present a unique-in-the world facility (EPI2SEM, https://bit.ly/3zN00dx) for EPItaxial growth and in situ analysis of 2SEM in ultra-high vacuum. EPI2SEM consists of a custom-designed reactor for molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) whose UHV operation matches the UHV requirements for in situ analytical techniques, such as RHEED (reflection high energy electron diffraction), SPM (scanning probe microscopy) and nanoESCA (electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis). By integration of growth, advanced microscopy and spectroscopy in UHV, we device methods to create atomically thin semiconductors based on MC with engineered physical properties beyond the current state-of-the-art.  

Amalia Patanè 
11:50 11:50 - 12:40

Two-dimensional Xenes: Synthesis, pocessing and manipulation

Alessandro Molle

Isolation of graphene paves the way to a new and unprecedentedly rich fashion of two-dimensional (2D) materials. While many of them can be readily derived by mechanical exfoliation in the form of single-crystal flakes, a synthetic approach to the 2D materials production is functional to have both scalability and atomic control as enabling factors for applications and technology transfer. While many of them are derived through exfoliation methods, an urgent need remains as to how to synthesize them through scalable schemes and manipulate them in diverse configurations by design. To this purpose, a bottom-up approach to the crystal growth is functional to have both scalability and atomic control as enabling factors for applications and technology transfer. Xenes, namely 2D single-element materials, are a representative case in this respect [1]. Here, I will report on the more relevant methods to synthesize representative cases of these two classes of 2D materials with focus on the manipulation potential, processing scheme, and integration steps into application platforms. Here I will show several bottom-up approaches to the controlled synthesis and manipulation of 2D materials beyond graphene.

Xenes are he natural followers of graphene as they are 2D crystal made by single atoms beyond carbon. They constitute an emerging nanomaterials platform with potential for quantum nanoelectronics, spintronics, and topological application [2]. A taxonomy of the Xenes will be presented with element X spanning from the IV column of the periodic table (e.g., silicene), to the adjacent columns (e.g. borophene, phosphorene, tellurene, etc.). I will show how large area Xenes can be produced through epitaxial methods by leveraging on a tailored choice of the growth conditions [3], how they should be stabilized to further up the integration into transistor device structures [4], and how they may ultimately end up in multiple Xene combinations inside epitaxial Xene heterostructures [5]. In the end, I will bring the discussion to the manipulation of the above-mentioned 2D materials to extreme bendable layouts so as to prove their versatility to be used in flexible substrates or configurations.

Acknowledgement: funding from H2020 ERC-COG grant n. 772261 “XFab”.

Alessandro Molle
13:00 13:00 - 14:30
Networking

Lunch

14:30 14:30 - 19:30
Networking

Group activity

19:30 19:30 - 23:30
Networking

Farewell dinner & poster award

07:00 07:00 - 10:00

Checkout

07:00 07:00 - 08:45
Networking

Breakfast

09:00 09:00 - 09:50
Lecture

Exciton polaritons in TMDs

Jamie Fitzgerald

Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayers possess a rich landscape of bright and dark excitons due to their multi-valley bandstructure, large spin-orbit coupling, and strong Coulomb interaction between charge carriers [1]. Furthermore, they can be stacked to form van der Waals heterostructures which support spatially separated interlayer excitons. If a finite twist angle is applied between the TMD layers, excitons can form flat bands and become spatially localized in the resulting moiré potential. Such material configurations represent an exciting new direction for exploring many body physics and designing optoelectronic devices. In this talk, I will review some of our research at the Ultrafast Quantum Dynamics Group at the Philipps University of Marburg, and give a didactic introduction to the theoretical techniques that we employ to model 2D semiconductors, i.e., the semiconductor Bloch equations. I will also focus on the hybridization of excitons with cavity photons in the strong coupling regime, and discuss a combined density-matrix and Hopfield approach we have developed to model a TMD mono-/bi-layer integrated within a high-quality Fabry-Perot microcavity. I will conclude with a discussion of some recent work where we provide a first microscopic model of moiré exciton polaritons [2], optical signatures of exciton polariton-dark exciton interactions via phonons [3], and explore strategies for efficiently coupling light into interlayer polaritons.  
 
[1] Perea-Causin, Raul, et al. "Exciton optics, dynamics and transport in atomically thin semiconductors." arXiv preprint arXiv:2209.09533 (2022).  
[2] Fitzgerald, Jamie M., Joshua JP Thompson, and Ermin Malic. "Twist Angle Tuning of Moiré Exciton Polaritons in van der Waals Heterostructures." Nano Letters (2022).  
[3] Ferreira, Beatriz, et al. "Signatures of dark excitons in exciton-polariton optics of transition metal dichalcogenides." arXiv preprint arXiv:2209.03133 (2022).  

Jamie Fitzgerald
09:50 09:50 - 10:40

Scalable synthesis of high-quality 2D materials and vdW heterostructures

Camilla Coletti

To make bidimensional (2D) materials realistically appealing for applications, approaches to synthesize them in a scalable manner while maintaining high crystalline quality have to be demonstrated and optimized. In this talk, I will discuss the most common synthetic approaches to obtain wafer-scale growth of 2D materials such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides, and 2D homo- and heterostructures and discuss the properties and applicative prospects of these materials. 

Camilla Coletti
10:40 10:40 - 11:00
Networking

Coffee break

11:00 11:00 - 11:50
Lecture

Contact and phase-engineering of 2D materials

Peter Bøggild

One main limiting factor for many types of 2D device applications is contact resistance. While semiconducting 2D materials offer a very wide range of band structures, different useful electronic and optical properties that are generally easy to tune, it is surprisingly challenging to achieve low, ohmic contact resistance between a metal contact and the semiconductor. In the lecture the main causes of 2D contact resistance are briefly explained. While 2D materials are difficult to contact, they also offer some exciting possibilities for materials engineering that can alleviate contact resistances: surface functionalisation, Fermi-level depinning and using semimetallic TMDs as contact materials. Finally, I will discuss phase engineering - controlled phase transitions - and how powerful this tool can be in addressing not only contact resistance, but also new functionalities in 2D materials and devices.

Peter Bøggild
11:50 11:50 - 12:40

2D-EPL

12:40 12:40 - 13:10
Networking

Lunch and Transfer Out

To be confirmed.

Henri Happy

Meet the chair

Henri Happy is a professor with University of Lille. His research take place at Institute of Electronic, Microelectronic and Nanotechnology (IEMN)- University of Lille -France. His current research field focus on nanodevices, and particularly carbon devices including carbon nanotube, graphene and related 2D materials. These activities concern understanding of fundamental limitations and improvement of high frequency performance of carbon devices, and their applications in emerging fields of RF circuits on rigid and flexible substrates.

Research group: CARBON: https://www.iemn.fr/la-recherche/les-groupes/carbon

How to reach Obergurgl, Ötztal, Tirol

Obergurgl is easy to get to. The nearest airport is Innsbruck and transfers to the venue take about 90 minutes by private transfer or rental car. The nearest train station to Obergurgl is at Otztal, about a 45 minute drive away.

Keep in mind that Obergurgl is at the end of the Ötz valley, near the border with Italy and the high altitude means that it can be problematic to reach in bad weather and heavy snowfall.

https://www.ski-austria.com/obergurgl/travel.php

By train
https://www.gurgl.com/winter/holiday-region/how-to-get-there/traveling-train.html

By plane
https://www.gurgl.com/winter/holiday-region/how-to-get-there/traveling-plane.html

Shuttle services
https://www.gurgl.com/winter/holiday-region/how-to-get-there/shuttle-service.html ttle Services

Please contact the University Center Obergurgl if you need assistance booking your transfer.

Connections to Obergurgl, Austria

Students at Graphene Study discussing scientific posters.

Student grants

Students attending Graphene Study 2023 and submitting an abstract (as first or second author) may apply for a student grant from the Graphene Flagship.

The purpose of this support programme is to encourage and promote the professional development of students in the field. It is considered an important tool for fostering the next generation of graphene researchers and a key element in the continuous renewal of the Graphene Flagship community.

Eligible students may apply to receive a 300 Euro discount on the delegate fee. Only early-bird applications will be considered for a Graphene Study 2023 grant. First come, first served.

Read student grant guidelines

This event is fully booked!

Registration conditions by category 
The registration fees do NOT include 21% Austrian VAT. All fees are in Euros. 

Fee category 
* Only 50 places available 

Early  

30 January 2023 

Normal* 

20 March 2023 

 

Student with Grant 

€250 

€300 

 

Student 

550 

600 

 

Academic 

650 

700 

 

Industry 

750 

€750 

 

 

Your registration includes: 

  • Registration 
  • Full accommodation (hotel at the University Center) 
  • Catering (breakfast, lunch, dinner, + 2 coffee breaks/ day) 
  • Conference dinner on Wednesday 
  • Social programme (as described in the programme) 
  • Conference materials 

Graphene Study 2023

Don't miss the chance to learn from and network with senior researchers in Obergurgl, Austria on 2-6 April.

 

Host partners